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Proceedings of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences An open-access publication for refereed proceedings in hydrology

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Proc. IAHS, 370, 29-32, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-370-29-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
11 Jun 2015
Analysing the impact of urban areas patterns on the mean annual flow of 43 urbanized catchments
B. Salavati1, L. Oudin1, C. Furusho2, and P. Ribstein1 1Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, EPHE, UMR7619 Metis, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France
2IRSTEA, Hydrosystems and Bioprocesses Research Unit, Parc de Tourvoie, BP 44, 92163 Antony CEDEX, France
Abstract. It is often argued that urban areas play a significant role in catchment hydrology, but previous studies reported disparate results of urbanization impacts on stream flow. This might stem either from the difficulty to quantify the historical flow changes attributed to urbanization only (and not climate variability) or from the inability to decipher what type of urban planning is more critical for flows. In this study, we applied a hydrological model on 43 urban catchments in the United States to quantify the flow changes attributable to urbanization. Then, we tried to relate these flow changes to the changes of urban/impervious areas of the catchments. We argue that these spatial changes of urban areas can be more precisely characterized by landscape metrics, which enable analysing the patterns of historical urban growth. Landscape metrics combine the richness (the number) and evenness (the spatial distribution) of patch types represented on the landscape. Urbanization patterns within the framework of patch analysis have been widely studied but, to our knowledge, previous research works had not linked them to catchments hydrological behaviours. Our results showed that the catchments with larger impervious areas and larger mean patch areas are likely to have larger increase of runoff yield.

Citation: Salavati, B., Oudin, L., Furusho, C., and Ribstein, P.: Analysing the impact of urban areas patterns on the mean annual flow of 43 urbanized catchments, Proc. IAHS, 370, 29-32, https://doi.org/10.5194/piahs-370-29-2015, 2015.
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We applied a hydrological model on 43 urban catchments in the United States to quantify the flow changes attributable to urbanization. Then, we tried to relate these flow changes to the changes of urban/impervious areas of the catchments. We argue that these spatial changes of urban areas can be more precisely characterized by landscape metrics. Our results showed that the catchments with larger impervious areas and larger mean patch areas are likely to have larger increase of runoff yield.
We applied a hydrological model on 43 urban catchments in the United States to quantify the flow...
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